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Glycine

Other name(s):

aminoacetic acid

Unsubstantiated claims

There may be benefits that have not yet been proven through research.

Glycine may help with ischemia-reperfusion injury.

Glycine may help treat schizophrenia. But different studies don't agree. Taking glycine by mouth may reduce symptoms of the condition in people who are resistant to other medicines.  

Recommended intake

Amino acids (AAs) can be taken as single AAs or in AA combinations. They also come as part of multi-vitamins, proteins, and food supplements. The forms include tablets, fluids, and powders.

If you eat enough protein in your diet, you get all of the amino acids you need.

There are no conditions that increase how much glycine you need.

Side effects, toxicity, and interactions

Using a single amino acid supplement may lead to negative nitrogen balance. This can lessen how well your metabolism works. It can also make your kidneys work harder. In children, taking single amino acid supplements may also cause growth problems. It may also cause seizures and developmental delays.

Don't take high doses of single amino acids for long periods of time.

Don't take high doses of single amino acids without talking with your healthcare provider.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding shouldn’t take glycine supplements.

Online Medical Reviewer: Diane Horowitz MD
Online Medical Reviewer: Raymond Kent Turley BSN MSN RN
Online Medical Reviewer: Rita Sather RN
Date Last Reviewed: 1/1/2019
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